Officers


Ronda L. Brulotte, President
University of New Mexico

Ronda Brulotte is Associate Professor of Geography and Anthropology and Associate Director for Academic Programs at the Latin American & Iberian Institute at the University of New Mexico. Her research and teaching interests focus on the economic and social impacts of tourism, critical heritage studies, materiality, and food studies. She has conducted ethnographic fieldwork in Oaxaca, Mexico since 1998, and is trained in Latin American Studies more broadly.
<brulotte(at)unm.edu> | See Webpage


Walter E. Little,
 Past President
University at Albany, SUNY

Walter E. Little is an Professor in the Departments of Anthropology and Latin American and Caribbean Studies at the University at Albany. His fields of interest include cultural heritage, global tourism, language pedagogy, political economy, and street vendors in Guatemala and Oaxaca.
<wlittle(at)albany.edu> | See webpage


Clare Sammells,
Treasurer
Bucknell University

Clare Sammells is Associate Professor of Anthropology at Bucknell University. She has conducted extensive ethnographic fieldwork in Andean Bolivia and among Bolivian migrants in Spain on the gastronomy of rural, urban and restaurant cuisines; archaeological tourism; solstice celebrations; and conceptions of time.
<c.sammells(at)bucknell.edu>


Quetzil Castañeda, JLACA Editor in Chief
Indiana University

Dr. Quetzil Castañeda is a Senior Lecturer in the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies (2018–present) and Member of the Graduate Faculty at Indiana University. Quetzil is the founding director of OSEA – the Open School of Ethnography and Anthropology, which is an independent, non-degree school that offers field study abroad and transcultural exchange programs (http://www.osea-cite.org). He has over 30 years of experience conducting research in México on identity politics, heritage, tourism, anthropology of art, ethics, visual ethnography, applied anthropology, language revitalization, and representation. His interdisciplinary teaching has found home in History, Latino Studies, Latin American Studies, Spanish Literature, Sociology and Anthropology departments. Quetzil’s areas of expertise include Maya language, Maya culture, México, Guatemala, visual ethnography, heritage, tourism, museum studies, ethnography of archaeology, ethnographic fieldwork/methods, New Age spiritualism, histories of anthropology, ethics, and culture theory.
<jlaca.editor(at)osea-cite.org


Luisa Rollins Castillo,
Secretary
University of Illinois at Chicago
<lrolli2(at)uic.edu>

 

 


Timothy J. Smith,
Councilor
Appalachian State University

Timothy J. Smith is Associate Professor and Chair of Anthropology at Appalachian State University. His research and teaching cover the cultural politics of representation and indigenous movements, cultural and political constructions of knowledge, language and culture, contemporary Latin America, identity formation, and the practical application of theory/ knowledge. He has conducted fieldwork in Guatemala since 1997 and Ecuador since 2007.
<smithtj2(at)appstate.edu>|See webpage


Iván Sandoval-Cervantes,
Councilor
University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Iván Sandoval-Cervantes is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Las Vegas, Nevada. He has conducted research on migration and gender in Oaxaca. He is currently conducting ethnographic research in Ciudad Juárez, examining the relationship between animal rights, activism, and violence.
<ivan.sandoval-cervantes(at)unlv.edu>|See webpage


Rachel Horrowitz,
Councilor
Appalachian State University

Rachel A. Horowitz is a Lecturer in the Department of Anthropology at Appalachian State University. Her research examines ancient Maya economic organization through the lens of lithic, or stone tool, technology. Her current research focuses on stone tool economies among the Classic period Maya in western Belize and eastern Guatemala. She has previously conducted research in other areas of the Maya world, as well as in the western and southeastern United States and southern Africa. <rachel.a.horowitz(at)gmail.com>


Nell Haynes,
Councilor
Georgetown University

Nell Haynes is an Assistant Teaching Professor of Anthropology at Georgetown University, with affiliations in the Center for Latin American Studies and Women’s and Gender Studies. She focuses on urban altiplano Bolivia and Chile , looking at the ways indigenous peoples produce and consume popular culture forms. Using performance, media, and visual art as a lens she explores the reshaping of discourses on race, gender, class, and politics.
<nell.haynes(at)georgetown.edu>| See Webpage


Chris Garces,
 Councilor
Universidad San Francisco de Quito

Dr. Garces’s ethnographic interests range from the study of politics and religion—or contemporary political theologies–, to the unchecked global development of penal state politics, and the history of Catholic humanitarian interventions in Latin
America.
<chrisgarces(at)alumni.princeton.edu>


Mónica Salas Landa,
 Councilor
Lafayette College

Mónica Salas Landa is assistant professor of anthropology at Lafayette College. She earned a PhD in anthropology, with a concentration in Latin American studies, from Cornell University in 2015 and was a postdoctoral fellow at the Mahindra Humanities Center at Harvard University the following year. She specializes in twentieth- and twenty-first-century Mexico with a focus on state formation, nation building, and social memory. She is currently working on her first book, a historical ethnography of the  lowlands of northern Veracruz, which examines the ongoing effects of the Mexican Revolution’s main social and economic programs.
<salaslam(at)lafayette.edu>See Webpage


Annie Wilkinson,
Student Councilor
University of California at Irvine

Annie Wilkinson is currently a doctoral student at the University of California at Irvine. She holds a Master in Gender and Development from FLACSO-Ecuador and is the author of Sin sanidad, no hay santidad: las prácticas reparativas en Ecuador (Cleanliness is Holiness: Reparative Practices in Ecuador), published by FLACSO-Ecuador (2013). Her research interests include the geopolitics of gender and sexuality, missionaries in Latin America, and transnational social and political movements.
<akwilkin(at)uci.edu>


Jordan Lynton,
Student Councilor
Indiana University

Jordan Lynton is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Anthropology at Indiana University, Bloomington. Her research examines issues of race, national identity, development, and diaspora within Chinese communities in Jamaica.
<jylynton(at)umail.iu.edu>